The Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center School of Medical Laboratory Science was founded in 1946 and is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science (NAACLS), 5600 N. River Rd, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018-5119; ph (847)-939-3597. The School provides a stimulating environment to furnish high quality technical training and expose students to the philosophy and ethics of the Medical Laboratory Science profession.

The School of Medical Laboratory Science is affiliated with the University of Maine. Students obtain thirty-two college credits, upon satisfactory completion of their clinical training. Upon graduation from the program, students are eligible to take national certification examinations and are well on their way to a rewarding career in medical laboratory science.

From the drawing of blood specimens to the accurate and timely reporting of laboratory data, the skilled hand of the medical laboratory scientist is a vital factor in patient care. As an explorer of the world of microscopic cells, you will find your way to an exciting career. Demand for your skills is endless not only here in Bangor, Maine, but throughout the United States. Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center invites students to take that first step toward a rewarding and challenging career as a medical laboratory scientist.

Your education through the School of Medical Laboratory Science will take you places — whether working with the healthcare team, researching the many sciences, or working with the nation's industries — your knowledge and hands-on experience will be invaluable to your success.

Northern Light Laboratory is accredited by the College of American Pathologists and serves Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center as well as dozens of hospitals, nursing homes, and physician offices throughout the state. Northern Light Laboratory provides the variety and volume of specimens necessary to provide comprehensive training in the field of Medical Laboratory Science.

School of Medical Laboratory Science Mission

The School of Medical Laboratory Science is committed to providing high quality education and laboratory experience to prepare its graduates to work, upon career entry as competent and ethical professionals with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to meet the needs of the profession.  The School also strives to prepare our graduates for leadership roles in the clinical laboratory and instill an understanding of the need for maintaining continuing competency in a rapidly changing and dynamic profession. 

Program Goals

The goals of the School of Medical Laboratory Science are:

  1. Provide instruction and evaluation based on identified competencies and objectives relevant to the practice in all major areas of medical laboratory science.
  2. Provide students with opportunities to develop interpersonal attitudes needed to work independently and professionally with patients and other health care professionals.
  3. Assure that entry-level practitioners are adequately prepared to withstand the pressures of the job, including the ability to multitask, maintain stability under pressure, and work accurately and efficiently.
  4. Provide students with opportunities to meet specific course objectives and entry-level competencies, both cognitive and psychomotor, in all areas of the clinical laboratory.
  5. Prepare medical laboratory science graduates for entry level positions in the workforce.
  6. To encourage students to be lifelong learners as they seek to maintain professional competence and continuing education for career growth.
  7. Provide students with adequate knowledge and clinical experience to pass a national certification examination appropriate to their level of training.

Description of Entry Level Competencies of the Medical Laboratory Scientist

*At entry level, the medical laboratory scientist will possess the entry level competencies necessary to perform the full range of clinical laboratory tests in areas such as Clinical Chemistry, Hematology/Hemostasis, Immunology, Immunohematology/Transfusion medicine, Microbiology, Urine and Body Fluid Analysis and Laboratory Operations, and other emerging diagnostics, and will play a role in the development and evaluation of test systems and interpretive algorithms.

The medical laboratory scientist will have diverse responsibilities in areas of analysis and clinical decision‐making, regulatory compliance with applicable regulations, education, and quality assurance/performance improvement wherever laboratory testing is researched, developed or performed.

At entry level, the medical laboratory scientist will have the following basic knowledge and skills in:

  1. Application of safety and governmental regulations and standards as applied to clinical laboratory science;
  2. Principles and practices of professional conduct and the significance of continuing professional development;
  3. Communications sufficient to serve the needs of patients, the public and members of the health care team;
  4. Principles and practices of administration and supervision as applied to clinical laboratory science;
  5. Educational methodologies and terminology sufficient to train/educate users and providers of laboratory services;
  6. Principles and practices of clinical study design, implementation and dissemination of results.

*National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (May 2020). NAACLS Standards for Accredited and Approved Programs (MLS Unique Standards).
 

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Five courses are required as part of the Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) Program.

 
 
Course Number
 
Description
Credit Hours
(Combination of lecture, labs and bench training)
 
 
 
 
BIO 422
Clinical Hematology
Course content covers the theory and clinical applications of hematology and coagulation. Topics include the production, function and morphology of blood cells, the identification of normal and abnormal cells as they correlate to disease, the study of coagulation and the diagnostic features of hematologic and coagulation disorders. Emphasis is placed on the significance of laboratory results obtained as they related to diagnosing hematologic and coagulopathy blood diseases and disorders.
The clinical training will give the student hands-on experience with the practical aspects of clinical hematology and coagulation with emphasis on principles, methodology, quality control, instrumentation and manual methods to assist with the understanding of result interpretation, quality control and troubleshooting. Focus is placed on pre-analytical, analytical and post analytical elements of hematology.
 
 
 
 
7
 
 
 
BIO 423
Clinical Microbiology
 
Course content will introduce students to the microbial species that cause human disease. Topics include bacteriology, mycobacteriology, mycology, parasitology and molecular microbiology. Pathogenic species are discussed in comparison to normal flora.
The clinical training will give the student hands-on experience with the practical aspects of clinical microbiology with emphasis on safety, specimen processing and culture setup, quality control, organism identification, susceptibility testing, and result reporting. The student will apply the knowledge and skills necessary for the isolation, identification and work-up of clinically significant organisms and other related microorganisms. Focus is placed on the significance of culture findings as they relate to disease states and pathogenicity.
 
 
 
7
 
 
 
BIO 424
Clinical Immunohematology
 
Course content will introduce students to the immunologic and genetic principles of blood banking.  Topics include ABO, Rh and other blood group systems; pre-transfusion testing procedures, compatibility testing, donor testing, component storage, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, neonatal and obstetric practice, autoimmune hemolytic anemias and adverse effects of transfusion.
The clinical training will give the student hands-on experience with the practical aspects of immunohematology with emphasis on pre-analytical, analytical and post analytical elements of testing.  Test methods include ABO typing, antibody detection and identification, compatibility testing, transfusion reactions and component therapy.
 
 
 
7
 
 
 
 
BIO 425
Clinical Chemistry
Course content will introduce students to the principles and procedures of various tests performed in clinical chemistry.  Topics include the principle and procedures for the test, physiological basis for the test, and the clinical significance of the test results.  Other topics include quality control, electrolytes, acid-base balance, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes, vitamins, endocrine function and toxicology.
The clinical training will give the student hands-on experience with the practical aspects of chemistry with emphasis on principles and methodologies, manual and automated procedures, statistical approaches to data evaluation and principles of quality control and quality assurance, maintenance, and instrumentation to assist with the understanding of result interpretation and troubleshooting. Focus is placed on pre-analytical, analytical and post analytical elements of testing in chemistry.
 
 
 
7
 
 
BIO 426
Clinical Microscopy and Special Topics
 
Course content will introduce students to the principles and procedures of phlebotomy, including the conceptual, procedural, legal and ethical aspects of working with specimens, samples and patients.
Students are also introduced to the principles and procedures of urinalysis, including renal anatomy and physiology, clinical correlations, and microscopic techniques.   
 
The clinical training will give the student hands-on experience with the practical aspects of phlebotomy and urinalysis.  The phlebotomy training will emphasize the fundamentals of specimen collection, specimen processing and handling with a minimum performance of 80 successful unaided blood collections including venipuncture and skin punctures will be performed.
The urinalysis training will emphasize processing of routine urinalysis, microscopic examinations, and special urine chemistries.
Special topics include a brief overview of program policies, lab safety, ethics, professionalism, lab management, educational theory and methods, and the writing intensive/capstone project.  
 
 
4

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Program Administration

  • Leigh Belair, MEd, MT (ASCP), Program Director
  • Kristen Murray, MLS (ASCP)CM, NLL Education Manager and MLS Clinical Liaison
 

Northern Light Laboratory Administration

  • Branagon Dow, MBA, MLS(ASCP)CM, Associate Vice President
  • Dr. Orin Buetens, Lab Medical Director
 

Didactic Faculty:

 

Transfusion Medicine:

  • Tara Rabideau, MLS (ASCP)CM, SBB 
 

Hematology/Coagulation/Urinalysis

  • Denise Jones MLS (ASCP)CM
  • Deborah Pellegrino, MT (ASCP)
  • Kristen Murray, MLS (ASCP)CM
  • Chelsey Gracia, DO, Pathologist
 

Microbiology:

  • Emily Farnham, MLS (ASCP)CM
 

Chemistry:

  • Emily Fichera, MLS (ASCP)CM
  • Breana Riquier, MLS (ASCP)CM

 
The instructor-to-student ratio in the didactic training is 1:8 and the ratio in the clinical training does not exceed 1:2.

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During the program, students attend classes and participate in various clinical activities. Time is divided between the classroom, student laboratory and clinical laboratory settings.

  • Program start: The first week of August
  • Program end: The third week of June
  • Total time: 47 weeks

Students are expected to be in attendance Monday through Friday, 8:00 – 4:00 for the lecture days. The typical schedule for a clinical experience is Monday through Friday, 6:00-2:30, 7:00-3:30 or something similar.  On a rare occasion, a student may be scheduled for an “evening shift” experience (3:30pm – 11:00pm or something similar). Students will be fully informed of these schedules well enough in advance to make personal arrangements.
There are two vacation weeks built into the schedule: one week at Christmas and one week in March. In addition, the following holidays will be observed by the School of Medical Laboratory Science:
  • Labor Day
  • Thanksgiving and the day after Thanksgiving (2 days)
  • Christmas
  • New Year's Day
  • Memorial Day

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MLS students are not expected to perform service work and are not allowed to take the place of qualified staff during any clinical rotation.  After demonstrating proficiency, students with qualified supervision may be permitted to perform procedures.  During the clinical practicum, students may perform patient testing under the supervision of qualified laboratory personnel responsible for their training. 

A clinical institution, which employs a currently enrolled MLS student as a laboratory assistant or phlebotomist, will schedule the student for work ONLY during non-instructional hours.

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MLS Program Director

Leigh Belair, MEd, MT(ASCP)
lbelair@northernlight.org
Phone: 207-554-7066 


MLS Clinical Liaison

Kristen Murray, MLS (ASCP)CM
kmurray@northernlight.org
Phone: 207-275-1514

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